Opportunity

The health and biomedical research workforce will become truly diversified when socioeconomic barriers are overcome, allowing individuals from all backgrounds to become members and leaders of their fields. Focused opportunities must be provided for individuals from low-income and diverse backgrounds, and the major goal is to ensure that individuals with interest and passion also have the skills, accomplishments, network, and support system required to succeed at each level of training.  We strive to provide these opportunities through our Johns Hopkins Initiative for Careers in Science and Medicine (CSM) pipeline effort.

To date, the CSM Initiative has served 353 scholars.  This includes 160 5th Graders (one-week science camp), 129 high schoolers (6 and 8 week summer internships with academic fortification), 47 undergraduates (10-week summer internships), and 23 post-baccalaureates (up to two-year mentored research-intensive training).  83% of our high school scholars have matriculated into 4-year college programs and 73% have chosen STEM majors.  At the other end of the spectrum, 60% of our post-baccalaureate scholars have matriculated into MD, MD/PhD, and PhD programs.

The CSM Initiative has been funded, in part, by a Health Careers Opportunity Program grant (non-renewable) through the Health Resources and Services Administration.  We also receive support from the Thomas Wilson Foundation, United Way of Central Maryland, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and private donors.  If you are interested in helping support the Johns Hopkins Initiative for Careers in Science and Medicine, please contact Doug Robinson (dnr@jhmi.edu) or Katie Sullivan, Associate Director of Development (ksulli52@jhmi.edu).

Our Programs

News

July 21, 2017

The Careers in Science and Medicine went to the Hill to advocate for the Health Careers Opportunity Program, which supports

Example Publications Authored by CSM Scholars

McAdams-DeMarco MA, Ying H, Thomas AG, Warsame F, Shaffer AA, Haugen CE, Garonzik-Wang JM, Desai NM, Varadhan R, Walston J, Norman SP, Segev DL. Frailty, Inflammatory Markers, and Waitlist Mortality Among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease in a Prospective Cohort Study. Transplantation. 2018; 102(10):1740-1746. PMID: 29677074.
Chavez-Valdez R, Emerson P, Goffigan-Holmes J, Kirkwood A, Martin LJ, Northington FJ. Delayed injury of hippocampal interneurons after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia in a murine model. Hippocampus. 2018;  28(8):617-630. PMID: 29781223.
Perez-Dulzaides R, Camacho E, Cordero RJB, Casadevall A. Cell-wall dyes interfere with Cryptococcus neoformans melanin deposition. Microbiology. 2018; 164(8):1012-1022. PMID: 29939127.
Osman G, Rodriguez J, Chan SY, Chisholm J, Duncan G, Kim N, Tatler AL, Shakesheff KM, Hanes J, Suk JS, Dixon JE. PEGylated enhanced cell penetrating peptide nanoparticles for lung gene therapy. J Control Release. 2018; 285: 35-45.  PMID: 30004000.
McAdams-DeMarco MA, Konel J, Warsame F, Ying H, González Fernández M, Carlson MC, Fine DM, Appel LJ, Segev DL. Intradialytic Cognitive and Exercise Training May Preserve Cognitive Function. Kidney Int Rep. 2017; 3(1):81-88. PMCID: PMC5762950.